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Project on Government Oversight

Congress vs. the President: The Scope and Limits of Congressional Oversight Powers

Related Content: Congressional Oversight
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July 1, 2009

You are invited to join us for:

Congress vs. the President:
The Scope and Limits of Congressional Oversight Powers

Thursday, July 16, 2009
Noon – 1:30 p.m. (Lunch provided)
Taking place in the National Press Club’s Murrow Room
529 14th St, NW Washington DC

[The proper role of the legislature is] to watch and control the government; to throw the light of publicity on its acts; to compel a full exposition and justification of all of them which any one considers questionable; to censure them if found condemnable.
– John Stuart Mill

We will discuss the relative powers of Congress and the Executive Branch in congressional oversight and why such authority is vital to our system of government.

Panelists include:

Mickey Edwards; former Member of Congress (R-OK), 1977-1993

Morton Rosenberg; author/contributor to the handbooks; former Specialist in American Law at the Congressional Research Service staffer, and Constitution Project Fellow

Chris Shays; former Member of Congress (R-CT), 1987-2009

Ronald Weich; Assistant Attorney General for Legislative Affairs for President Barack Obama 

There will be copies available for purchase of The Art of Congressional Oversight: A User’s Guide to Doing It Right, published by the Project On Government Oversight ($21.10 cash or check made out to Project On Government Oversight)

You will be able to pick up a copy of When Congress Comes Calling: A Primer on the Principles, Practices, and Pragmatics of Legislative Inquiry, published by the Constitution Project and authored by Morton Rosenberg.
 
The event is free, but RSVPs are required.
RSVP to rsvp@constitutionproject.org

Co-hosted by the Constitution Project and the Project On Government Oversight (POGO)

Founded in 1981, the Project On Government Oversight (POGO) is a nonpartisan independent watchdog that champions good government reforms. POGO’s investigations into corruption, misconduct, and conflicts of interest achieve a more effective, accountable, open, and ethical federal government.

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