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Shutdown Cost DoD $600 Million

A spokesperson for the Department of Defense (DoD) estimated that the government shutdown cost the Pentagon at least $600 million due to losses in productivity. That number may rise as long-term costs continue to reveal themselves.

According to a blog post on DEFCON Hill, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel criticized Congress over the shutdown and the effect it had on his department’s civilian workers.

"We cannot continue to keep doing this to our people," Hagel said, noting the back-to-back furloughs the Pentagon initiated as a result of sequestration and the shutdown. 

"Good people will leave the government" because of that uncertainty, Hagel said. "They are not going to put up with this . . . we have got to have some certainty here.”

Unlike most departments, many of the DoD’s civilian workers were allowed to return to work four days into the 16-day shutdown.

As the Project On Government Oversight previously reported, the shutdown also meant a loss of DoD oversight. The Pentagon stopped reporting contract awards (as they’re legally obliged to do) and said they planned to make “one big announcement” once the funds were appropriated.

They announced the day’s contracts yesterday, but made no reference to what happened during the dark days of the shutdown. We’ll be waiting.

By: Avery Kleinman
Beth Daley Impact Fellow, POGO

Avery Kleinman Avery Kleinman is the Beth Daley Impact Fellow for the Project On Government Oversight.

Topics: National Security

Related Content: Budget, Information Access, DOD Oversight, Defense

Authors: Avery Kleinman

Submitted by Dfens at: October 18, 2013
That must be $600 million dollars of our money the Pentagon wasn't able to waste because of the shutdown. I'm pretty sure "productivity" and "Pentagon" are an oxymoron.

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