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Project on Government Oversight

Report Corruption

FOR YOUR PROTECTION, DO NOT USE A GOVERNMENT, CONTRACTOR OR GRANTEE PHONE, FAX, OR COMPUTER TO CONTACT POGO.

The Project On Government Oversight has a long history of working with individuals daring to expose corruption. Many of these individuals with whom POGO has worked choose to keep their identity hidden from the public and even to POGO itself.

If you have information regarding fraudulent or wasteful activities in the government or the industries it regulates, and you would like to expose it in order to keep the government accountable to its citizens, please contact us.

POGO may be able to further research your concerns, bring public attention to any wrongdoing, and alert those who can bring about change. We've been watchdogs since 1981.

How POGO Chooses Its Projects

The following are the guidelines by which POGO determines which projects we pursue. They do not present rigid criteria, but provide us with a consistent way to evaluate our priorities.

  • Capacity to make a unique contribution
  • Opening for positive systemic change in the federal government
  • Ability to broaden public awareness
  • Urgency for action
  • Availability of inside sources and/or documents

For more information on how POGO works on its projects, see our About page.

What POGO Does Not Do

  • We do not deal with local and state issues unless federal money is involved.
  • We do not provide legal advice or representation. Moreover, we will not recommend a specific legal counsel.
  • We do not look at individual cases of fraud or waste unless they are directly representative of systemic or widespread problems in the federal government and/or its contractors.
  • We do not expose cases that cannot be verified or independently corroborated by government records or other sources.

POGO evaluates every lead we receive. However, because we are a small organization, we can only pursue the few tips that meet our internal guidelines and allow us to maximize our impact by performing the greatest public service. Thank you for understanding our intentions and limitations.

If your information does not involve the federal government then we cannot look into your allegations, but may be able to refer you to another organization. Click here for other resources.

The Downside of "Whistleblowing" or Exposing Corruption

Whistleblowing is often not easy. Exposed whistleblowers are almost always reprimanded, fired, and/or harassed, even if they have not "gone public" and even if their allegations are proven to be true. It takes a lot of courage and forethought to take on a powerful government agency or a private contractor or grantee. The mental, emotional, and financial hardships that a whistleblower may encounter should be fully understood before any steps are taken to disseminate information - publicly or not.

POGO will work to protect your identity while trying to expose and remedy the problems you have identified. This allows the whistleblower to expose wrongdoing while lowering the risk of jeopardizing their career. Unless you have already been publicly labeled as a whistleblower, we usually do not recommend making your identity public and exposing yourself to the many risks associated with doing so.

SecureDrop

To help protect your anonymity, POGO has set up a SecureDrop server as a way for you to share information and files directly with POGO more securely than with conventional email, other electronic means or a phone call.

Click below to submit documents or messages to POGO using our SecureDrop system.

Emailing POGO

If you have any conceivable need for confidentially now or in the future, you should use the SecureDrop system linked above. If you believe the information you have does not require anonymity or security, then you can submit it by email to POGO using reportcorruption@pogo.org.